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Can I Still Drive After a DUI? After being arrested for driving under the influence, it is entirely common to ask a number of questions. Will I face jail time? Will a conviction impact my employment status? Will I still be able to drive after the arrest? Regaining your driving privileges after being charged with driving under the influence can be a complicated process, but it is entirely possible to continue to legally drive after the arrest and even after a conviction. There are steps you will need to take to get back on the road after a DUI arrest.

Losing Your Driving Privileges

According to the Illinois Secretary of State’s Office, 90 percent of eligible drivers lost their driving privileges after being arrested on DUI charges. While many people think that they can only lose their driving privileges if they are convicted of a DUI, the arrested party will face a statutory summary suspension automatically after the arrest if they fail or refuse chemical testing. While a driver that refuses chemical testing will diminish the likelihood of a DUI conviction, they will face a one-year statutory summary suspension. If a driver is ultimately convicted of a DUI, their license will likely be revoked for one year. Fortunately, the duration of the suspension will count towards the revocation period. 

Regaining Your Ability to Drive 

In Illinois, a first-time DUI offender can request a Monitoring Device Driving Permit (MDDP), which will give them limited driving privileges. In order to gain an MDDP, a driver must equip their vehicle with a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID). The BAIID will be monitored and will restrict the vehicle from starting if traces of alcohol are present in the driver’s breath. While the driver will have to pay for installation and monitoring of the BAIID and also face rises in their insurance payments, they will be able to continue to drive. Driving is a critical part of a person’s quality of life. If you have any questions on how to regain your driving privileges when facing DUI charges, speak with your attorney. 

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The Penalties for Violating Driving Restrictions After DUIMillions of Americans lose their driving privileges every year. A driver can lose their driving privileges for a number of reasons, but the most common cause is a DUI conviction. While a DUI conviction will likely lead to a license suspension, it does not mean that the person will necessarily be unable to drive. There are a number of ways in which a person can regain their driving privileges after a DUI conviction, including a Monitoring Device Driving Permit (MDDP) and a Restricted Driving Permit (RDP). While both MDDPs and RDPs can represent great options for DUI offenders to regain their ability to drive, it is important to understand the legal consequences of breaking the rules and regulations of both permits. Below we will discuss the legal ramifications of illegally driving with a suspended license

The Legal Ramifications

First and foremost, if a driver with a suspended license does not take the necessary steps to gain a permit such as those mentioned above, they are not permitted to drive in any scenario. If they are apprehended while driving, they will likely be charged with a Class A misdemeanor and face fines as high as $2,500. While those consequences seem severe, the legal consequences of breaking the rules of an MDDP or RDP come with significant and potentially life-changing ramifications.

An MDDP will allow a driver to drive freely as long as their vehicle is equipped with a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID). That being said, if the driver is apprehended while driving a vehicle without a BAIID, they will face a Class 4 felony charge. A driver with two or more intoxicated driving offenses can apply for an RDP, which essentially allows a driver to drive to and from critical locations such as work, the grocery store, and their child’s school. Breaking the well-documented rules of the RDP will lead to loss of the permit and potential jail-time. For more information on suspensions, reinstatement, and your permit options, speak with a knowledgeable attorney today. 

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Regaining Your Driving Privileges After a DUI When a person is convicted of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, their life can be impacted in a number of ways. A conviction can result in significant fines, potential jail time, and a mark on your criminal record. Unfortunately, a conviction can also lead to loss of driving privileges. In Illinois, a first-time DUI conviction will result in a one-year license revocation period, and subsequent offenses can constitute a more significant period of revocation. Below we will explore the steps you need to take to ensure that you will still be able to legally drive after a conviction. In the event of a DUI arrest, contact a qualified attorney immediately. 

Permit Options

According to the Illinois Secretary of State’s Office, there are two primary driving permits a person can apply for if they are convicted of DUI: 

  • A Monitoring Device Driving Permit (MDDP); and
  • A Restricted Driving Permit (RDP). 

An MDDP is a driving permit that will enable the offender to drive to and from any location, as long as they equip their vehicle with a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID). A BAIID is a device that will allow the vehicle to start only after the driver blows into their device and is found to have no traces of alcohol in their system. An RDP is a driving permit that will allow the offender to drive their vehicle to and from locations that are critical to their family’s livelihood. These locations commonly include their place of work, the grocery store, or the school their children attend. 

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