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DuPage County DUI defense lawyerThe ubiquitous red Solo cup is likely to appear in your hand at some point during a seasonal party. Here are some handy tips to help you track your alcoholic beverage consumption in terms of the current standard, 18-ounce, squared Solo cup. Knowing how much you have consumed will help you stay safe and avoid the chance of an arrest for driving under the influence (DUI).

What Constitutes a “One Drink” of Beer, Wine, or Liquor

With today’s wide variety of alcoholic beverage choices, you really have to be aware of the alcohol content of your drink of choice. The number of ounces one “standard” serving varies from 1 ounce to 12 ounces:

  • Bourbon or whiskey labeled “barrel proof” or “single barrel” (120 proof, 60% alcohol): 1 ounce.
  • Standard liquor (80 proof, 40% alcohol): 1.5 ounces.
  • Wine, champagne, sparkling wine (12% alcohol): 5 ounces.
  • Imperial stout or double IPA (10% alcohol): 6 ounces.
  • Craft beer (6% alcohol): 10 ounces.
  • Regular beer (4.5% alcohol): 12 ounces.
  • Hard cider or hard lemonade (5% alcohol): 12 ounces.

How to Manage Your Consumption by Solo Cup

When mixing a cocktail, pour the liquor in first. 3 ounces will amount to about an inch of liquid in the bottom of your Solo cup. The liquid should just touch the bottom of the word Solo that is spelled down the side of the cup. Add mixer and ice, and that will be the equivalent of two drinks. (Let us assume the use of real glasses for those single barrel bourbons and whiskeys.)

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Illinois DUI lawyerWeekends are often spent having a good time with family and friends. When people attend social gatherings, alcohol is often involved. Even though many people make the wise decision to choose a designated driver who will safely drive everyone home, there are several others whose decisions are not as wise. People may “pregame,” or drink before a social gathering or event, which may include drinking and driving, and therefore illegally carrying alcohol in the car.

Consequences of Illegally Carrying Alcohol in a Vehicle

In the state of Illinois, it is illegal to carry or possess alcohol in the passenger seat of a car. It must be in the original container and the seal unbroken during transport. If a driver is caught illegally transporting alcohol in his or her car, then there will be a maximum fine of $1,000 and a violation on that person’s record.

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Illinois defense attorneyCommon sense says that it is illegal to use a fraudulent state ID card or driver’s license, or what many people jokingly call a “Fake ID” or a “fakie.” An evening social gathering or a night of drinking at the local bar can be a fun way to spend time with family and friends. However, if a person is caught sneaking into a bar or restaurant with a fake ID, some very serious repercussions may follow.

What Can Happen If Caught with a Fake ID?

If a person is caught using a fake ID, then he or she may lose driving privileges for up to one year. However, trying to obtain a fake ID or driver’s license, allowing another person to use your ID, posing as one’s own ID or driver’s license issued to another person, and allowing unlawful use of a driver’s license or ID will count toward a Class A misdemeanor, with punishment of one year in jail and fines of up to $2,500. Any following offense will count toward a Class 4 felony.

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thc marijuana laws in illinois, DuPage County DUI defense lawyerIllinois has made significant strides toward more sensible marijuana regulations. Governor Quinn signed SB 2228 into law in 2016. With the signing of that bill, for the first time in Illinois, the courts did away with the "zero tolerance" policy regarding the operation of a vehicle while having Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in a person's system.

The way the law operates today is comparable to how the state regulates drinking and driving. In contrast to the way the old law worked where any presence of THC in a person's system was enough for a marijuana DUI conviction, the law now considers a tiered-based system. For example, the law mandates that someone is not allowed to operate a motor vehicle with more than 5 ng of THC per ml of blood or 10 ng of THC per ml of any other bodily substance.

Is Buzzed Driving the Same as Stoned Driving?

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