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How to React to a License Suspension or Revocation in Illinois There are a number of traffic violations that can result in loss of driving privileges in Illinois. From aggravated speeding or reckless driving charges to a charge of driving under the influence, it is important to understand how to react to a traffic violation. Having your driver's license suspended or revoked can significantly impact your livelihood. In the event of a DUI conviction, the likelihood of revocation of some length is very high. If you face charges for driving under the influence, speak with a quality attorney right away. 

Driving Permit Options 

According to Illinois state law, a first-time DUI offender faces an automatic minimum license revocation of one full year. Fortunately, a first-time offender can qualify for a Monitoring Device Driving Permit. (MDDP). In order to secure an MDDP, a person must install a blood alcohol ignition interlock device (BAIID) and camera into their vehicle.  

The BAIID will ensure that the person cannot start their vehicle with any traces of alcohol in their system. The camera gives local law enforcement officials the opportunity to view the driver taking part in the breath test. It should be noted that a driver with an MDDP can operate any vehicle with a BAIID and drive to any location. If a person is apprehended while driving a vehicle that is not equipped with a BAIID, they could face substantial fines and potential jail-time.  

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DuPage County criminal defense attorneysIf you or a loved one are stopped for a traffic violation and suspected of driving under the influence (DUI) of drugs or alcohol (or for any other criminal offense), you will have several opportunities to make it either easier or more difficult for the police to gather evidence and the District Attorney to nail you with a “guilty” verdict. Remember, the goal of the police is to find evidence of your guilt.

Here are some tips to protect yourself against common police tactics related to vehicle searches, which are purposely employed to intimidate, mislead, or lure you into self-incrimination.

If Police Ask to Search Your Car Without Probable Cause, You Can Refuse

If you are stopped on a traffic violation, that does not give the police an automatic right to search your car.

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IL defense lawyerImagine that you are driving down a suburban street at night, in a rush to get home. Flashing lights appear; you are being pulled over by the police for speeding. The officer stands at your window and asks for your license and registration. As you retrieve those items for inspection, the officer shines a flashlight into your car and spots a bottle of whiskey on the passenger seat. The officer is now wondering whether you are guilty of a more serious offense, such as driving under the influence (DUI).

This is when things get interesting. The officer casually asks, “You mind if I have a look in your car?”—intending to learn if that bottle is open and shows signs that you have been drinking out of it, which would help support a DUI charge. If you agree, you have just consented to a search of your entire car, and anything the police find can be used as evidence against you. Or you have the right to say, “No, I do not give consent for any searches.”

Let us assume that you do not give consent for a search. Can the police officer now legally search your car without your consent?

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Illinois DUI lawyerDrinking socially can be a way to unwind from a stressful week, as long as the individual drinking is doing so responsibly. Many parents, legal guardians, and other adults have furnished alcohol to their children, even if under the age of 21. However, even though the furnishing of alcohol may not be in a public place, the state of Illinois still considers this action to be illegal and it may come with very serious charges, including driving under the influence, if the person drinking alcohol decides to drive afterward.

Why Is Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor Illegal in Illinois?

If an adult over the age of 21 provides alcohol to a person under the age of 21, he or she may face some very serious consequences. The individual may face a fine of up to $2,500 and one year in jail for a misdemeanor offense. However, if the individual is charged with a felony, he or she may face a fine of up to $25,000 and at least one year in prison.

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